Research Reports: Effect of Temperature in Flooding to Control the Wireworm Melanotus Communis (Coleoptera: Elateridae)

David G. Hall, Ronald H. Cherry

Abstract


Larvae of Melanotus communis (Gyllenhal) collected from sugarcane fields in southern Florida were held in soil flooded with water for 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 or 6 weeks at 18, 21, 24 or 27@*C. At each temperature, regression analyses indicated that the percentage of wireworms killed increased linearly as flood duration was increased. Increasing the temperature maintained during a flood significantly increased the percentage of wireworms that died. Multiple regression analysis indicated that Y = -94.4 + 7.1X"1 + 4.3X"2, where Y was the expected percent mortality, X"1 was flood duration in weeks, and X"2 was temperature in degrees Celsius (R@^2 = .76). The equation may be used to estimate how long a flood should be continued at a given temperature to obtain a desired level of wireworm control under field conditions.

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