Host Status of 'SeaIsle 1' Seashore Paspalum (Paspalum vaginatum) to Belonolaimus longicaudatus and Hoplolaimus galeatus

A. C. Hixson, W. T. Crow, R. McSorley, L. E. Trenholm

Abstract


Belonolaimus longicaudatus and Hoplolaimus galeatus are considered among the most damaging pathogens of turfgrasses in Florida. However, the host status of seashore paspalum (Paspalum vaginatum) is unknown. Glasshouse experiments were performed in 2002 and 2003 to determine the tolerance of 'SeaIsle 1' seashore paspalum to a population of B. longicaudatus and a population of H. galeatus, and to compare to 'Tifdwarf' bermudagrass for differences. Both nematode species reproduced well on either grass, but only B. longicaudatus consistently reduced root growth as measured by root length. Belonolaimus longicaudatus reduced root growth (P = 0.05) by 35% to 45% at 120 days after inoculation on both grasses. In 2003, higher inoculum levels of H. galeatus reduced root growth (P = 0.05) by 19.4% in seashore paspalum and by 14% in bermudagrass after 60 and 120 days of exposure, respectively. Percentage reductions in root length caused by H. galeatus and B. longicaudatus indicated no differences between grass species, although Tifdwarf bermudagrass supported higher soil population densities of both nematodes than SeaIsle 1 seashore paspalum.

Keywords


belonolaimus longicaudatus; bermudagrass; hoplolaimus galeatus; host status; lance nematode; paspalum vaginatum; seashore paspalum; sting nematode; tolerance

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