Evaluation of 31 Potential Biofumigant Brassicaceous Plants as Hosts for Three Meloiodogyne Species.

Scott Edwards, Antoon Ploeg

Abstract


Brassicaceous cover crops can be used for biofumigation after soil incorporation of the mowed crop. This strategy can be used to manage root-knot nematodes (Meloidogyne spp.), but the fact that many of these crops are host to root-knot nematodes can result in an undesired nematode population increase during the cultivation of the cover crop. To avoid this, cover crop cultivars that are poor or nonhosts should be selected. In this study, the host status of 31 plants in the family Brassicaceae for the three root-knot nematode species M. incognita, M. javanica, and M. hapla were evaluated, and compared with a susceptible tomato host in repeated greenhouse pot trials. The results showed that M. incognita and M. javanica responded in a similar fashion to the different cover cultivars. Indian mustard (Brassica juncea) and turnip (B. rapa) were generally good hosts, whereas most oil radish cultivars (Raphanus. sativus ssp. oleiferus) were poor hosts. However, some oil radish cultivars were among the best hosts for M. hapla. The arugula (Eruca sativa) cultivar Nemat was a poor host for all three nematode species tested. This study provides important information for chosing a cover crop with the purpose of managing root-knot nematodes.

Full Text:

PDF