Audience Reactions to Climate Change and Science in Disaster Cli-fi Films: A Qualitative Analysis

Lauren N Griffin

Abstract


Little scholarly attention has been paid to how audiences interpret pop culture messages about climate. This paper addresses this issue by taking up the case of disaster cli-fi films and exploring how audiences react to film representations of climate change. It draws on data from focus groups to evaluate audience responses to disaster cli-fi films. Analysis reveals that by only briefly discussing climate change in their plotlines, the films weaken their environmental message. The paper concludes with a discussion of the effects of disaster cli-fi films on environmental attitudes and suggestions for further research.


Keywords


climate change; narratives; mass media; public understanding of science; focus groups

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References


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DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.32473/jpic.v1.i2.p133

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